Sylvan Lake Municipal Library

Book Club

Mar 28, 2018  |  Fourth Wednesday of each month, 6:30-8:00 PM

Adults

A terrific way to expand reading horizons and meet people in the community. New members are welcome!

The Book Group is a terrific way to expand reading horizons and meet new people in the community. Titles include both fiction and non-fiction and are chosen by the group. Meetings are informal and all members are invited to share their reading insights.

Meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of each month, 6:30 p.m. No charge. New readers are always welcome! Members must supply their own copies of books to be read (library staff are happy to help you place a hold on a copy to borrow).

Make a title suggestion for the Book Group or get more information
Do you have a terrific book to suggest for the Book Group reading list? Please email the title, and why you are suggesting it; be sure to type "Book Group Title" in the subject line. Title suggestions will be considered by the group.

Cover image for   March 28, 2018 selection is "One Native Life" by Richard Wagamese.

A wise and warm-hearted chronicle of one Ojibway man and his journey back to himself


In 2005, award-winning writer Richard Wagamese moved with his partner to a cabin outside Kamloops, B.C. In the crisp mountain air Wagamese felt a peace he’d seldom known before. Abused and abandoned as a kid, he’d grown up feeling there was nowhere he belonged. For years, only alcohol and moves from town to town seemed to ease the pain.

In One Native Life, Wagamese looks back down the road he has travelled in reclaiming his identity and talks about the things he has learned as a human being, a man and an Ojibway in his fifty-two years. Whether he’s writing about playing baseball, running away with the circus, attending a sacred bundle ceremony or meeting Pierre Trudeau, he tells these stories in a healing spirit. Through them, Wagamese celebrates the learning journey his life has been.

Free of rhetoric and anger despite the horrors he has faced, Wagamese’s prose resonates with a peace that has come from acceptance. Acceptance is an Aboriginal principle, and he has come to see that we are all neighbours here. One Native Life is his tribute to the people, the places and the events that have allowed him to stand in the sunshine and celebrate being alive. (Douglas & McIntyre)